Effects of level and form of dietary zinc on dairy cow performance and health

Cope, M., Mackenzie, A.M., Wilde, D. and Sinclair, L.A. (2008) Effects of level and form of dietary zinc on dairy cow performance and health. Journal of Dairy Science, 92 (5). pp. 2128-2135.

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Abstract

A basal mixed ration supplying 36 mg of Zn/kg of dry matter (DM) was supplemented with 1 of 4 concentrates differing in level and form of dietary Zn. The concentrates were fed at 2 kg/cow per day and contained 300 mg of Zn/kg (to supply the total recommended level, according to NRC (2001); R) or 60 mg of Zn/kg (to supply 0.66 of the total recommended level; L), either supplemented as ZnO (I) or organically chelated Zn (O). Forty-four Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (12 primiparous and 32 multiparous), on average 31 d (SD ± 11.4) into lactation, were allocated to 1 of the 4 treatments. All cows remained on the treatment for 14 wk. The data was analyzed by ANOVA as a 2 × 2 factorial design. Dry matter intake averaged 23.5 kg/d and did not differ between treatments. Cows supplemented with organically chelated Zn at the recommended level of inclusion (RO) had a higher milk yield (37.6 kg/d) than those fed inorganic Zn at the recommended level (RI; 35.2 kg/d) or organically chelated Zn at the low level (LO; 35.2 kg/d), but was not different from those fed inorganic Zn at the low level (LI; 36.0 kg/d). Milk composition was unaffected by dietary treatment. Animals that received the low level of Zn (LI and LO) had higher somatic cell counts [3.97 and 3.93 versus 4.35 and 4.55 (loge) for RI, RO, LI, and LO, respectively] and milk amyloid A levels than those receiving the recommended levels (RO and RI). There was no effect of treatment on body condition score, body weight, or locomotion score. Hoof hardness improved over the duration of the study but there were no differences between treatments. Similarly, blood plasma mineral levels for Zn, Cu, Mo, and Fe were not affected by treatment, whereas there was a trend for increased ceruloplasmin levels in cows receiving the recommended compared with the low level of Zn, but there was no effect of mineral form. There was also no effect of treatment on superoxide dismutase activity or blood hematology. It is concluded that supplementing Zn at the recommended level reduced somatic cell counts and milk amyloid A levels, whereas supplementation in an organic form at the recommended level also increased milk yield.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Animal Production, Welfare and Veterinary Sciences
Depositing User: Mr Darren Roberts
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2018 15:26
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2018 15:26
URI: http://hau.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/16287

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