Connecting developmental and process physiology to improve yield with a film antitranspirant.

Kettlewell, P.S. and Holloway, J.R. (2010) Connecting developmental and process physiology to improve yield with a film antitranspirant. Aspects of Applied Biology, 105, Water and nitrogen use efficiency in plants and crops. pp. 23-24.

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Abstract

Research on film antitranspirants has focused on process physiology and has shown that these materials reduce both transpiration and photosynthesis. It was concluded that crop yield would be reduced by antitranspirant application. Separate research into developmental physiology has, however, shown one specific stage is especially sensitive to water stress in wheat. Connecting these facts enables a hypothesis to be proposed that reduced photosynthesis may be less important for yield than conserving water in the plant at the most sensitive stage. A spray of a film antitranspirant at the booting stage has increased yield of droughted wheat by 42% consistent with this hypothesis.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Crop and Environment Sciences
Depositing User: Mr Darren Roberts
Date Deposited: 08 Nov 2018 15:42
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2018 12:14
URI: http://hau.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/16809

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