Heathland management effects on carabid beetle communities: the relationship between bare ground patch size and carabid biodiversity

Cameron, K.H. and Leather, S.R. (2012) Heathland management effects on carabid beetle communities: the relationship between bare ground patch size and carabid biodiversity. Journal of Insect Conservation, 16 (4). pp. 523-535.

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Abstract

Carabid beetles were sampled by pitfall trapping on Brentmoor Heath, Surrey, UK during the summers of 2009 and 2010 to determine the effects of bare ground patch size on beetle abundance, richness and diversity. Four patch sizes were investigated: 1, 4, 25 and 100 m2 as well as the adjacent mown and unmown areas. A range of environmental parameters relating to soil characteristics, stones and nearby vegetation were measured at each patch and control habitat in order to distinguish the effect of patch size. Results show that bare ground is a valuable habitat for carabids, but that the response of their abundance, richness and diversity to bare ground patch size depends on a large number of environmental variables on and around the patches. When all variables are taken into account, smaller patches appear to benefit carabid abundance, richness and diversity. In the presence of Molinia caerulea at the patch edges, however, larger patches were more beneficial. Given this dependence on environmental variables, the perfect patch size for conservation of biodiversity is likely to be site specific and the best approach may be to use a variety of patch sizes at a range of successional stages.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Crop and Environment Sciences
Depositing User: Mr Darren Roberts
Date Deposited: 28 Nov 2018 09:19
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2018 11:46
URI: http://hau.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/16985

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