The effect of locomotion score and foot lesions on kinematic measures of gait in dairy cattle.

Blackie, N., Bleach, E.C.L., Amory, J. and Scaife, J. (2013) The effect of locomotion score and foot lesions on kinematic measures of gait in dairy cattle. Journal of Dairy Science, 96 (9). pp. 3564-3572.

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Abstract

The objective was to determine whether changes in the different components of gait, walking speed, and lying behavior were associated with hoof pathologies in lactating Holstein cows. In experiment 1, 53 cows had their gait scored, their walking speed estimated, and their lying behavior monitored before clinical assessment of the hooves. Multiparous cows with ulcers scored higher than cows without ulcers for overall gait score [numerical rating score (NRS); 3.3 ± 0.2 vs. 2.8 ± 0.2], back arch, joint flexion, asymmetric steps, and reluctance to bear weight. Although cows with ulcers did not walk more slowly than cows without ulcers (1.4 m/s), they spent more time lying down (827.8 ± 29.1 vs. 738.2 ± 15.5 min/d) because of longer lying bouts (93.3 ± 5.9 vs. 79.7 ± 3.4 min). In experiment 2, 47 cows were monitored for hoof health and changes in gait score from 4 wk before to 24 wk after calving. Differences were found after calving between cows that developed an ulcer and cows that did not for NRS (3.1 ± 0.1 vs. 2.35 ± 0.1), back arch, joint flexion, asymmetric steps, and reluctance to bear weight. Numerical rating score, back arch, and asymmetric steps were able to discriminate cows with ulcers at least 4 wk before the diagnosis. Cows that developed a sole ulcer had a faster decline in lying time during the periparturient period and a faster increase beginning in wk 2 after calving. The NRS was a more consistent predictor of sole ulcers than lying behavior or speed. The NRS was able to discriminate cows with ulcers across studies at a high intraobserver accuracy and reasonable specificity and was able to predict the presence of ulcers at least 4 wk before diagnosis. Abduction/adduction of the rear legs, head bob, and tracking-up did not consistently discriminate cows with ulcers, and we suggest that these measures are less useful for on farm gait assessment. Compared with the other gait attributes, back arch, joint flexion, asymmetric steps, and reluctance to bear weight best predicted the presence of sole ulcers.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Animal Production, Welfare and Veterinary Sciences
Depositing User: Mr Darren Roberts
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2018 11:24
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2018 11:24
URI: http://hau.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/17045

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