The role of rendering in relation to the BSE epidemic, the development of EU animal by‐product legislation and the reintroduction of rendered products into animal feeds

Woodgate, S.L. and Wilkinson, R.G. (2021) The role of rendering in relation to the BSE epidemic, the development of EU animal by‐product legislation and the reintroduction of rendered products into animal feeds. Annals of Applied Biology.

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Abstract

The bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic in 1986 highlighted the importance of the rendering industry as a key component of the food supply chain. Prior to 1986 the rendering industry was poorly understood. However, following the emergence of BSE research was commissioned to characterise rendering systems and investigate their ability to inactivate transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents. Six rendering systems were found to be operational in Europe but their key process parameters, such as particle size, process temperature and transit time, were poorly characterised. This review describes how these key process parameters were determined and used to inform protocols for the subsequent TSE inactivation trials which subsequently shaped both EU legislation and the development of techniques used to validate rendering systems. It also describes how EU legislation banning the use of animal‐derived proteins in animal feeds ('feed ban') effectively eliminated the market for meat and bone meal (MBM) and how the rendering industry sought to 'add value' to rendered products by conducting research to support the development of new markets for rendered products. The nutritional, environmental and economic characteristics of modern processed animal proteins (PAPs) mean that they represent valuable ingredients for use in animal feeds. Recent research has paved the way for legislative changes allowing the safe reintroduction of nonruminant PAP into aqua‐feeds and may soon facilitate their reintroduction into pig and poultry feeds. However, resistance from key stakeholders in the food chain remains a significant challenge that must be overcome before their full potential can be realised. Further research is required to characterise modern PAPS and to ensure their appropriate, safe and acceptable inclusion in animal feeds.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: animal by‐products, EU legislation, processed animal protein, rendering
Divisions: Agriculture and Environment (from 1.08.20)
Depositing User: Mrs Rachael Harper
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2021 15:52
Last Modified: 22 Jul 2021 11:30
URI: https://hau.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/17630

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